New Comic Reviews: Getting it Together #1, Batman #100 and Amazing Spider-Man #49

Hey! 

Thank you for reading Sequential Stories! I started it just a few months ago, and I’ve already gotten a great response. It appears people are enjoying the blog, which means a lot. Some of you even support the blog on Patreon, which is incredible. 

I’m going to do something a little different this week and let you know that this is something you should come to expect sometimes. I’m changing things up a little bit! 

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Laura Ķeniņš edited a new anthology of comics about Canadian province Nova Scotia

In Nova Graphica, a comics anthology about the Canadian province Nova Scotia that released this week, Laura Ķeniņš both edited the anthology and contributed a comic for it. 

“I wouldn’t say that I’ve viewed myself as either thing first or over the other,” Ķeniņš said. “I would say with this book that’s coming out, I’d view myself first and foremost as editor on this project.”

Ķeniņš, based in Toronto, Canada, has led a career that has synergized cartooning, comics editorial work and journalism, and in her latest project, Nova Graphica, all of those passions have coalesced. 

Laura Ķeniņš self-portrait

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Jared Cullum brings gorgeous watercolors to his graphic novel ‘Kodi’

Jared Cullum became fascinated by comic books because of comics like Blankets, but he also got really into watercolor painting. 

“I got totally absorbed in art history and painting, and then it just sort of became an obsession,” Cullum said. 

As he delved more and more into studying and practicing watercolor painting, he pursued how he could “explore that stuff and really get lost in it and discover something,” he said, “or find something I can bring back to comics that might be a bit different.” 

27065DCF-5493-4A9E-9D7D-F1458623C0FA Continue reading

Derf Backderf combines journalism with cartooning in ‘Kent State: Four Dead in Ohio’

Derf Backderf attended art school as a young man and dropped out before long. He decided instead to do journalism school, where he enjoyed writing, taking photos and making cartoons for the school paper. After college, he had some stints doing political cartoons and comic strips for newspapers, and eventually, he yearned for more space to tell sequential stories. 

“My comic strips were not character-driven,” Backderf said. “It was all kind of stream-of-consciousness or gag stuff or weird, whatever popped into my head. Writing long-form books, you build them all around characters. I always thought that would be a fun way to write, and damned if it isn’t.” 

With his latest graphic novel released this month, Kent State: Four Dead in Ohio, Backderf has combined copious reporting with visual storytelling to recount the Ohio National Guard’s slaughter of unarmed college students protesting the Vietnam War. 

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Hot off an anthology of his ‘J&K’ comics, John Pham is nearing completion of a new issue of Epoxy

In his 20s, John Pham used to have a Fantagraphics promotional poster on his wall featuring artwork from classic cartoonists like Robert Crumb. He’d stare at it every day. 

When Pham originally started creating his one-man anthology comic series Epoxy in 1999, he didn’t have the confidence to submit it to publishers, but worked on it anyway, helped a great deal by a grant he received from the Xeric Foundation. He dreamed of Fantagraphics publishing his work. 

Earlier this year, Fantagraphics published an anthology of his current flagship comic strip J&K, one of the ongoing comics featured in Epoxy

“It was definitely a full-circle moment for me,” Pham said. 

Though he works a full-time animation gig while raising two young children with his wife in Los Angeles, Pham still finds time to continue his comics work through Epoxy

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Noah Van Sciver hundreds of pages into a comic book biography of Joseph Smith and the Mormon Church

Noah Van Sciver has seen a lot of progression in his artwork over time, just as many artists do.  

“You’re going to start with one specific art style that you’re trying to achieve but you’re not really there, and over the years it just kind of refines itself,” he said. “And then other influences come in and comingle and eventually, you have your own style. I started off as a complete Robert Crumb wannabee, and then over time, other influences come in. You see European artwork that’s looser, things like that.” 

Van Sciver has become a notable creator in the alternative comics scene – at the moment, he’s fresh off doing the art for Grateful Dead Origins, three years deep in a book about Mormonism-founder Joseph Smith and has a few comic collections releasing soon. 

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Simon Hanselmann takes to Instagram for new ‘Megg, Mogg and Owl’ comic

Simon Hanselmann’s beloved Megg, Mogg and Owl comic series usually comes in the form of zines and graphic novels, but once the pandemic hit, he figured he’d post new chapters almost once a day for free on his Instagram. Five months later, he’s still posting new chapters.

“It was supposed to just be for like 30 days,” Hanselmann said. “‘Oh, COVID will clear up in a month, everything will go back to normal.’ And, yeah, nothing did, and [the comic] just kept on going. And I enjoy it. I enjoy this model of creating. Just throwing it out for free.”

This new serialized storyline, dubbed “Crisis Zone,” follows Megg, Mogg and Owl’s crude, gross, hysterical and miserable misadventures navigating current events, and Hanselmann doesn’t plan on stopping until the United States election.

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Gabrielle Bell and her uncomfortable, cathartic process of making auto-biographical comics

Gabrielle Bell makes comics mainly about her life, and she doesn’t pick the most flattering or positive anecdotes. 

“Sometimes I’ve done some comics where I’m like, ‘this is going to totally make everyone appalled at me and just disgusted,’” Bell said. “And then it turned out people loved it and felt seen and recognized, and it brought people and myself together, and that’s encouraged me to explore it even more.” 

Bell has found success in illustrating comics about embarrassing or unpleasant moments of her life, combining honesty with anthropomorphic animals and other silly bits of fantasy to keep things light.  Continue reading

‘30 Rock’ and ‘Modern Family’ writer creating a comic with France-based artist about conspiracies and genius animals

Vali Chandrasekaran has made a name for himself as a writer on popular comedy television shows like 30 Rock and Modern Family. He’s wanted to write a comic for much of his life partly because of the intense freedom comic book creators have compared to other mediums.

“You just put your comic out into the world. It’s just what you want to make,” Chandrasekaran said. “You don’t need to convince other people… to raise the money to shoot a $500,000 or million dollar independent movie. I like how when you go to a comic store how weird it is.”

With France-based artist Jun-Pierre Shiozawa, Chandrasekaran decided to self-publish a comic called Genius Animals?, a comedy about a woman who gets wrapped up in a massive, genius-animals-related conspiracy after her boyfriend mysteriously disappears.

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Pat Grant, ‘The Grot,’ and the difficult, demanding task of creating a graphic novel

About eight years ago, Australian cartoonist Pat Grant started writing his graphic novel The Grot. He started the comic primarily channeling a fascination in con-artistry, but ended up finding himself interested in so many more aspects of the comic and its story. 

“As it happens when you’re telling stories, you become interested in it on its own terms and each of the individual characters on their own terms and it becomes something very human,” Grant said. “If you’re doing your job right.” 

The Grot, released in the United States by published Top Shelf Productions in June this year, is a 200-page graphic novel about two brothers navigating a world of con-artists in a dystopia brought about by a plague. Continue reading